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A rising star of the Asian art world Gwon Osang born 1974, obtained his M.F.A. in sculpture at HongIk University, Seoul, Korea in 2004. He has shown his work around the globe, done projects for Fendi and Nike, and collaborated on a record cover for the band Keane. Osang Gwon creates life-size figures of people through a combined use of sculpture and photography.

I started in 1998, in my third year of college. I debuted my first photo-sculpture in 1999. I majored in sculpture, which usually means making stone and metal works. Working with heavy materials hurt my back, so I wanted to come up with a process that was light. I thought of photography — it’s paper and it’s light.

I just used photographs; I assembled the photos in a paper-mâché style and the sculpture was hollow. As the sculptures got bigger, I began using a wire armature for support. But it was still hollow, which was problematic. Whenever people touched the work it went in, and it was hard to pull back out. So I started to use Styrofoam as a base for the imagery. I glue the photos in place and use epoxy resin to varnish and seal the final work via

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Marc Giai-Miniet  is a French artist who makes creepy and fascinating dioramas that tend to feature reproductions of human organs, crime scenes, submarines in basements and wait for it … libraries.

The miniature tableaus are terrific examples of art’s ability to transform seemingly predictable, mundane scenarios into absurd, freakish, and beautiful visual experiences.

Giai-Miniet’s libraries are detailed and striking, replete with book cover art, author names, and identifiable typography. Occasionally a diorama’s title will conjure a loose narrative, an obscure starting point from which the viewer might further consider the art via

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NeSpoon is a street artist from Warsaw, Poland. Her artistic focus is on the intricate patterns of lace, and breaking its granny stereotype by using it to beautify gritty urban spaces. NeSpoon calls her artistic approach the “jewellery of the public space”:

Jewellery makes people look pretty, my public jewellery has the same goal, make public places look better.

NeSpoon often uses the usual spray paint and stencils of enlarged lace patterns to produce her works on the street via

artist find at Lustik

Mileuri

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Steve Salo

When fire tore through Steve Salo’s studio in Torquay he was devastated. Inside the artist’s studio were approximately 70 of his paintings, and 80 drawings and sketchbooks, some of which he had treasured since a child. Every single one was destroyed. All of his art materials and tools were obliterated along with reference books and a cherished drawing case from his childhood. The blaze consumed everything, a lifetime of irreplaceable work reduced to ashes.

“I find it quite hard to talk about it now. The best thing for me is to put it behind me and not ponder over it,” Steve says, clearly still coming to terms with the emotional impact of the disaster that occurred nearly a year ago.

After the fire Steve says it felt like time stood still, “almost like a surreal dream”. He was overcome with confusion, disbelief and grief. For the next couple of months Steve had no desire to paint, unable to motivate himself to even pick up a paintbrush. Eventually, however, the urge to create returned and he began to paint, not with brushes but with his fingers. It was an important step in the healing process.

http://www.saatchiart.com/salo